Post by Category : Adult Sexual Abuse

Plea for $10m now to fight sex abuse

A sexual abuse prevention organisation has told the Government there is not enough funding to tackle sex abuse – and $10 million is needed now just to stabilise frontline services.

A parliamentary inquiry into the level of funding for victim support and offender treatment organisations has begun and will hear submissions from a dozen groups that work in the community.

Support groups for sexual abuse survivors say the sector is in crisis. There are fears some are shutting down and specialists in the field are leaving due to burn-out.

Rape Prevention Education executive director Kim McGregor told the Social Services select committee on Tuesday that organisations providing support for victims or treatment for offenders have been ignored by the Government for decades.

Ms McGregor said $10 million is needed to stabilise frontline services and called for a 10-year plan to be put in place with the aim of developing fully-funded services in the future.

A trustee for an Auckland sex abuse survivor group, Help, told the committee that funding for support is so low, they can’t meet the needs of all the city’s victims.

Debbie Hager said that although they have enough money to continue their work, they can’t employ enough staff to meet the needs of all the women and girls in Auckland who are raped or need complex support.

Green MP Jan Logie, who petitioned for the inquiry, said a recent survey of 22 support providers throughout New Zealand showed that over a third of them might cut staff.

Ms Logie said providers of therapy for offenders are also struggling, with some unable to treat people who voluntarily go to them for help.

Sexual assaults more than double world average

Sexual assaults more than double world average as reported on stuff.co.nz by  MARTY SILK

The rate of sexual assault in Australia and New Zealand is more than double the world average, according to a new report.

After several highly publicised rapes and murders of young women in India and South Africa, researchers from several countries  decided to review and estimate prevalence of sexual violence against women in 56 countries.

The results, published in the UK medical journal The Lancet, found that 7.2 per cent of women aged 15 years or older  reported being sexually assaulted by someone other than an intimate  partner at least once in their lives.

The study found that Australia and New Zealand has the third-highest rate, more than double the world average, with 16.4  per cent.

However, the study’s authors have cautioned that the figures  probably underestimate the true rate of sexual violence because in many areas women don’t report assaults because of underlying social  or cultural stigma.

NSW Rape Crisis Centre executive officer Karen Willis says Australia is doing a fairly good job recording sexual violence, but  that doesn’t mean we should sit back and think that all is  wonderful.

‘‘We have an endemic problem, it’s probably no better or worse  than anywhere else in the world,’’ she told AAP.

‘‘Unfortunately what we haven’t done is a much better job of  preventing it.’’

Willis said that it was especially sad there hadn’t been any change in the rate of sexual assault per capita this year.

She said that society, the government and the judicial system needed to work together to change the culture of some men.

‘‘It’s only a small group of men who commit these acts of  violence, but behind that small group is another whole range of  men, who are quite happy to talk in derogatory and demeaning ways about women or treat women in ways that indicate they’re  second-class citizens,’’ Willis said.

‘‘Those sort of cultures then allow at the extreme end, thos  that use violence to feel more comfortable doing so.’’

The Centre Against Sexual Assault’s Victoria spokeswoman Carolyn  Worth agreed, saying it was important to remember that many sexual  assaults were perpetrated by men who knew their victims.

‘‘After these assaults a lot of their friends ask ‘what was she  doing with him, she was drunk so why did she go back to his  house’,’’ she told AAP.

‘‘It has nothing to do with any of that, women and men deserve to go about their business unmolested, full stop.

‘‘No one has the right to have sex with anyone, they always need  consent.’’

Attorneys-General of several countries agreed to ‘work together to more closely to fight sexual violence against women and children’ at a high-level meeting in Auckland this week.

Attorneys-General resolve to support prosecutions of sexual violence

The Attorneys-General of Canada, Australia, the United States, New Zealand and England and Wales resolved to work together more closely to fight sexual violence against women and children at yesterday’s Quintet meeting of Attorneys-General in Auckland.

 

PDF of media release link is below

 

TOAH-NNEST 1

Horror In Paradise

Global outrage is growing against a Maldives court’s verdict announced on February 26, 2013 to flog a 15-year-old girl who was originally a victim of rape and sexual abuse. She now faces 100 lashes in public which will be administered when she turns 18.

More than two million people have signed a petition created by the campaign website Avaaz.org, urging Maldivian authorities to protect the girl and end the practice of flogging of women and children for sex outside marriage. The petition also threatens to hit at the country’s tourism industry until President Mohamed Waheed acts.

The girl has been a victim of sexual abuse dating back to 2009 and consecutive governments have failed to protect her, according to a report by Minivan News.

The court sentenced her to 100 lashes and 8 months of house arrest for confessing to a separate case – not related to the rape – of consensual sex with a man. She was first taken for questioning in 2012 when a dead baby was found buried inside her family compound. Her stepfather has been charged with murdering her baby and child sexual abuse while her mother has been charged with concealing the sexual abuse.

 

Sign the petition here

http://avaaz.org/en/maldives_global/?fp

International News – Duchess of Cornwall – supporting survivors of rape and sexual abuse

5th Feb 2013

The Duchess of Cornwall hosted a reception in support of survivors of rape and sexual abuse at Clarence House.

The Duchess organised the reception to bring together political figures, rape support groups and rape survivors.

She spoke to those present of the importance of forming a united front to help victims of rape and sexual abuse and

the need to end the taboo surrounding rape and sexual abuse, adding “perhaps from this small beginning, we will be able to

build a future where society will simply not tolerate rape and sexual abuse any longer”

 

Survivors and others attending stated the Duchess’s contribution was positive,  and you could tell she felt very passionately about the issue.

She had shown a level of commitment to this area, and her high profile had helped make possible a meeting focused solely on this issue

by a  wide range of representatives from various UK groups.

 

Death of 23 yr old student in India as result of gang rape, results in World-wide petition

Petition by

Namita Bhandare

New Delhi, India

To:

Pranab Mukherjee, President of India

Chief Justice of India, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of India

The gang-rape of a 23-year-old student in a moving bus on the night of December 16 in the capital city of Delhi has triggered anger, outrage and shock amongst every citizen this country.The National Crime Records Bureau records 572 rapes reported from Delhi for the year 2011. This year 635 rapes had already been reported as of December 15, 2012, Rape is not a problem that afflicts Delhi alone. In recent months, we have seen a rising crime graph against women being reported from virtually every corner of the country including Haryana, Kerala and Bangalore.Each time a rape is reported, civil society reacts with anger and outrage, which unfortunately dies down and is forgotten, until the next time. The question to ask: what is the inflexion point? At what stage do we say collectively and in one voice: Enough.

Many solutions have been offered in the light of this particular gang-rape and in the past. Some of these include:

1. The setting up of fast track courts (as in Rajasthan recently) to ensure speedy trials.
2. The imposition of maximum, exemplary sentence.
3. The immediate clearing of all pending cases involving crimes against women.
4. Immediate training and sensitisation of police force to crimes against women, including domestic violence, molestation and sexual assault.
5. The immediate passage of pending bills that seek to protect women, including the Protection of Women Against Sexual Harassment at the Workplace Bill 2012 and the Criminal Law (Amendment) Bill 2012
6. Consultations with the Ministry of Human Resources to see how best to address the issue of sensitising boys through the school curriculum.
7. National-level, open consultations involving civil society and other stake-holders on how best to tackle the growing misogyny and hostility against women as well as rising crimes against them.
8. Ensuring safe public transport for all citizens by installing CCTVs and conducting due diligence of employees including bus drivers, cleaners etc.

Despite having so many women in positions of political leadership, a survey by TrustLaw found India to be ranked as the worst country in the world for women. At a time when women are increasingly claiming their rightful share of half the sky and asserting their autonomy and independence, the rising crimes against them are conducted with absolute impunity by criminals who have no fear of the law.

We are writing to you in the hope that you will direct government and judiciary to take special note of the escalation of gender violence and work together on a priority basis to implement the measures detailed above.

Lack of gender justice, lack of fear of the law, police and judicial apathy, failure of governance and shrinking public spaces is a matter of grave concern, not just for women but for every citizen of this country.

Sincerely,
[Your name]